• Tag Archives Lough Sheelin
  • Perch Fry & Sedges – Lough Sheelin – Mid June

    Excellent spent gnat fishing is still to be had on Lough Sheelin. A good number of trout can been observed feeding on spent gnat late in the evening in calm slick conditions. The bright conditions this week coupled with the large amount of boats travelling on the Lough did tend to put the majority of fish down, only to appear again at dusk. A good angling ethic is advised for this time of the year as big Sheelin trout will only rise and feed if there is little disturbance on the water – extra caution is advised not to spook the trout. The may fly on sheelin had been early compared to recent years and as the season draws to a close perch fry will begin to make their appearance around mid June and become an important food item on a trout’s menu. Sheelin trout can appear to feed exclusively on the shoals of small fry and the anglers attention is generally attracted to the scene of the action by a succession of noisy splashes. Bashing trout lash the fry with their tails in an apparent effort to stun the tiny fish. They then feed on the dead fry lying on the surface.

    Sedges are the aquatic cousins of Butterflies and Moths.

    Although May Fly is still present on Sheelin trout will often ignore them and feed on surface Sedges late in the day and into the evening. The first stage of the sedges life is the larva where it builds itself a protective case from lake or riverbed debris. It stays in this form for up to a year, before gradually changing into the pupae stage. Once mature, the pupa eats its way out of its protective case before swimming to the surface. The final stage is the adult sedge. Its main characteristics are its tent-shaped wings and long antennae. Although some species are active during the day time, most sedges hatch during the evening and at night time. Its when the adults return to the water to lay their eggs, often skittering across the water’s surface, that some truly heart stopping angling can be enjoyed.

    Pictured above are some recent and past photo’s of Lough Sheelin, Lough Conn and lower Lough Erne.

    If you would like more information about this article, please feel free to contact me.

    Damien Willis +353 (0)868012546

    E-mail info@loughfishingbudies.com



  • Latest Angling Report Lough Sheelin 24/05/14

    Mother Nature and her Sheelin Trout

    Traditionally the 3rd week of May usually sees the Mayfly in full swing on Lough Sheelin, with the first flies between May 12th and 15th.

    The major angling activity for the hatch is usually located in area’s south and west of a line from Curry Point to Wilson’s Point. Sheelin brown trout can be caught on dun patterns fished dry. Trout will also feed on the ascending nymphs; try a wet mayfly or golden olive. However, it’s all about careful covering of a fish after watching for surface movement. The cream of the Mayfly fishing is with the spent gnat which begins when the mayfly hatch is in full swing and few days or a week after the first mayflies appear. During the Mayfly hatch, most fishing boats sit on the lee side of the shore, where the flies are dancing and wait. When the flies start moving out onto the lake, the boats follow wind lanes or ‘slicks’, carrying huge numbers of spent gnats from behind the islands.

    Experienced Sheelin anglers do more watching and waiting than casting and fishing. This week I have been admiring “Mother Nature” and her trout as they take Buzzers, Olives, May Fly and Spent Gnat  on Lough Sheelin. Pictured above are some fine examples of trout caught and released this week on the Lough. A special thanks to Greg, David, Willie and friends from Whales and Dublin who took some time off to  fly fish with me this past week.

    If you would like more information about this article, please feel free to contact me.

    Damien Willis

    Mobile +353(0)868012546

    E mail info@loughfishingbuddies.com

     

     



  • Lough Sheelin – Welcome to County Cavan

    Cavan has a well earned reputation for one of Ireland’s premier angling locations. There are many fine game and coarse angling river stretches and wild brown tout fisheries. The fisheries in County Cavan comprise of major river systems and their associated lakes. Many opportunies exist for the specialist angler. In West Cavan, the mighty river Shannon begins in journey from the Cuilcagh mountains. Its main tribuary, the river Inny flows from Lough Sheelin which is world famous for its hard fighting wild brown trout and is far one of the best fisheries in Europe. There are good hatches of Duck Fly along with some Olives early in the season which opens on March 1st. May fly hatches occur weather permitting from the middle of May and will often continue into late June. If the weather conditions are favourable some superb spent gnat fishing can be enjoyed late into the evening. In late July to September evening fly fishing with a rail of sedge patterns produce the best fish. A Shannon region Inland Fisheries permit is required to fish Lough Sheelin which can be purchased locally at the Crover House Hotel, Mountnugent or on line from Inland Fisheries Ireland. A comprehensive set of angling rules is given with every permit.

    A good ghillie should definitely know their stuff.

    Every trout fishery Varies. Trout, especially Lough Sheelin trout can be extremely elusive. If you have not fished Lough Sheelin before choosing a guide can be a great advantage to an angler especialy a guide who knows the trout in that particular lake. Everything differs by area; when to fish, what gear to use, how to cast, when to cast and what fly to use and so on. Choosing a good guide can be difficult. The main factor to consider is how long they’ve been in the angling guide business. Generally the longer a service has been in the area, the better the ghillie’s will be. The guides that have a well established presence in a particular area are the ones you should choose. Also full-time ghillie’s are generally better. These lad’s or ladies are more experienced. They spend as much of their lives as possible out fishing, and this experience can help you land the fish of your dreams. That’s not to say that all part-time ghillie’s are bad, but they are more likely to be hit-or-miss. If you want a great ghillie, not just a good ghillie; take your time and do some homework.

    If you would like more information about this article, please feel free to contact me.

    Damien Willis

    Mobile +353 (0) 868012546

    E-mail info@loughfishingbuddies.com

     

     



  • Latest Angling Report Lough Sheelin 22nd of May 2013 May up on Sheelin

    The topical subject, Any May Fly on Sheelin?  well see for your self, good numbers of fly are beginning to appear. I made a small video of what the hatch was like on the 27th of May 2011 – A very similar weather pattern but a good hatch  in the end if you can recall.

    Please Enjoy this short clip.

    Thumbnail

    Damien Willis

    Mobile +353(0)868012546

    E-mail info@loughfishingbuddies.com



  • May Fly on Sheelin

    Last Year it was the 9th of May when the first hatch of May Fly appeared on Lough Sheelin – May temperatures are much lower this year compared to last. I recently met up with some swimmers whom had been practising for an Iron man event on Lough Lene this week. They told me that the water temperature was only at 7C – The idea temp for a hatch of may fly is the majic 10c/ 50F. Ray Arnold of Virginia Cavan a veteran fly fisherman predicts that the fly is approx 5-7  day’s away on Ramor, Sheelin is in close proximity and will not be too far behind – Good news for all fly fishermen and women. I have been down to sheelin three times this week and spoke to various anglers whom have said the same.

    The Mayfly emerges from the water, goes through the transformation from nymph to fly, swarms, mates, and then lays its eggs and dies, all in the course of little more than an evening. In the 1600s both Charles Cotton and Issac Walton wrote on the subject promoting the use of Mayfly imitations. The Mayflies Life Cycle starts with adult female depositing her eggs in or on the water.The eggs then fall slowly onto the lake or river bottom and in time will develop into an aquatic insect called an immature nymph. These Mayfly Nymphs can spend as much as two years Borrowing, Crawling, Clinging, and Swimming around the bottom of the water feeding on algae, organic matter and microscopic organisms. The mayfly nymph will spend nearly 95% of its entire lifespan below the waters surface. When water reaches a temperature of 50 degrees F and maintains that temperature range for three consecutive days, there will be a Mayfly hatch. The Mayfly which is the holy grail of fly fishing makes its appearance in mid May and continues for approximately 4 to 6 weeks on Lough Sheelin.

    A Book by Cavan man Patsy Deery called Irish Mayflies is available from most good book stores and will give you a very good idea of the many imitations of this Holy Grail of insect.

    If you would like more information about this article, please feel free to contact me.

    Damien Willis + 353(0) 868012546

    e-mail info@loughfishingbuddies.com



  • Latest Angling Report Lough Sheelin – North Kerry Angling update

    Most parts of the country experienced it’s coldest April in almost 25 years with temperatures dipping to -6.6C in parts of Cavan and Mullingar – rainfall  was also above normal. In spite of this forecasters say that warmer weather is just around the corner – Temperatures over the bank holiday weekend are set to rise to 19C on Monday with moderate to light southerly winds, this should suit the fly fisherman.

    No sign of May fly on Lough Sheelin this week, however it will not be far away.

    This weeks pictures are from well known Lucan Anglers Greg Muldowney and David Penny whom both returned to  fly fish Lough Sheelin on Thursday – Both anglers caught and released safely 6 fish in total. A mix of dabblers on the dibble produced the biggest fish. I returned to one of my favourite spots in North Kerry  3 weeks ago in pursuit of some sea bass – Temperatures were a mere 3 – 6c with bitterly cold winds from the east – very little fish caught – Anglers are now reporting plenty small bass off inch  and surrounding strands at night time – best bait black lug which can be dug locally.

    If you would like more information about this article, please feel free to contact me.

    Damien Willis

    Tel – 0868012546

    e-mail info@loughfishingbuddies.com



  • Lough Sheelin Late in the season

    A fine evening on Lough Sheelin-Recent
    A fine evening on Lough Sheelin-Recent

    Sedge fishing is said to be the cream of the season on Sheelin and this commences in full swing from about mid June and continues right through to the end of the season in October 12th. Small brown sedges hatches become prolific as the season advances. Best methods are fishing dry in a small size from 14 to 16’s. Anglers fishing sedges this time of year are advised to look for calm spots on the lakes, sit and wait for rises. Anglers will also catch fish fishing blind, so vary tactics.

    The Lough also gets hatches of Silverhorn sedges and small dark sedges in August and early September. A small size 12 or 14 fished dry close to the shore especially towards dusk can often take a good trout. Useful fly patterns are Green Peter, Murrough or better known as The Great Red Sedge and smaller brown sedges. Trout will be caught by various methods and using flies not mentioned above. The fly angler should bear in mind two points: Best results are generally obtained along sheltered shores in a small to moderate wave. Fishing the evening rise into the night usually gets better results than day time fishing. Be careful and get to know the lake. Lough fishing buddies actively encourage all anglers to return as many fish as possible in order to safeguard the welfare of the fish for years to come.

    Local knowledge is invaluable in determining day to day timing and location of hatches, which in turn leads to locating the prime areas for fly fishing in the late evening.

    For more information, please feel free to contact me.



  • Latest Angling Report Lough Sheelin 4th May 2012

    Catching trout by using Wet flies dates back hundreds of years, well before the method of dry fly fishing was introduced.

    Wet fly fishing is one of the best ways for budding male and female anglers to be introduced to sub-surface fishing. Unlike dry fly fishing, where skill and practice and precise imitations are needed to effectively catch trout consistently, wet fly fishing can provide results quickly to even the beginner angler.

    Many wet flies imitate a struggling nymph  or small fry as it attempts to reach the surface of the water. These same wet flies also suitably imitate dead or drowning insects. Either way, one thing about wet flies is that they generally imitate aquatic insects in transit. For new anglers, an adequate cast and presentation is all that is required when wet fly fishing. The reason for this is because of the way most wet fly fishing is carried out. It neither requires perfect casts or timing when presenting the fly.

    Pictured below “Experienced” Lough Fishing Buddies Daniel Levy with some beautiful wild Sheelin Brown Trout

    (All returned safely)

    By using two or more flies an angler can improve their chances of finding fish. There are a countless flies obtainable for wet fly fishing. Most wet flies have soft hackling. The explanation for this is because this type of hackling has fibers in it that moves about in the water tempting the trout to seize it.

    Additionally most wet flies are designed to sink rather quickly. For this reason, many wet flies tend to be a little heavier, tied in a wide variety of ways, each way designed to sink the fly in a particular fashion. Wet flies are generally fished in areas that have fast moving water or in a good wave on the lake.

    Fishing a sink-tip fly line will assist the fly in getting down to the right depth; a floating fly line can also be used with a weighed nymph on the point. When a second, or third, fly is used, it is called a “dropper fly”. When setting up a dropper fly, simply attach the first fly onto the end of the tippet. Then, for the second fly, take a 12 inch of tippet material and tie it to the leader about 24-36 inches above the first fly.

    Attach the second fly to the end of that line. You now have a dropper fly set up. A note for beginner anglers, “to avoid tangles it is probably best to start with one fly”, and then graduate to two or more flies when comfortable with basic casting and wet fly fishing technique. Either way, one nice thing about a dropper fly is that it allows anglers to test out flies at the same time. It’s a great way to quickly experiment around to see what works and what doesn’t when covering the water.

    There isn’t really anything fancy about wet fly fishing. As long as an angler can do even just a basic cast, an angler can catch trout using wet flies. There are numerous other methods for fly fishing with wet flies. However, these methods tend to be rather more demanding, requiring greater skill on the part of the angler. Wet fly fishing used to be the most popular type of fly fishing. Today, it comes in a distant third to dry fly fishing and nymph fishing.

    Nymph fishing is now often times considered to be wet fly fishing. While the more precise fly imitations and more precision methods used in nymph fly fishing do indeed generally work better for catching larger, more wary trout. Anglers should never overlook fly fishing the traditional wet fly. This is especially true for beginner anglers, whom by wet fly fishing can be introduced to some of the basic principles and techniques used in nymph fishing while actually catching fish in the process.

    For further information about this article, please feel free to contact me.

    Damien Willis +353 (0) 868012546

    e-mail info@loughfishingbuddies.com



  • Why would anyone need a Ghillie?

    Why would anyone need a Ghillie?

    You just cast that fly opon the water and wait for the fish to come along, right? No way… There’s a lot more to it than that, and unless you’ve spent some time out there with no takes, then you will have no idea how much help a guide can be. Plus, you can learn from their expertise and knowledge. A good listing of local guides and ghillies can be found on www.inlandfisheries.ie

    Now, probably the biggest advantage to getting a ghillie is that every place is different. Trout, especially Lough Sheelin trout can be extremely elusive, so you want a guide who knows the trout in that particular lake. Everything differs by area; when to fish, what gear to use, how to cast, when to cast and what fly to use and so on. A good ghillie should definitely know their stuff. Another factor is how long they’ve been in the angling guide business. Generally the longer a service has been in the area, the better the ghillie’s will be. The guides that have a well established presence in a particular area are the ones you should choose. Also full-time ghillie’s are generally better. These lad’s or ladies are more experienced. They spend as much of their lives as possible out fishing, and this experience can help you land the fish of your dreams. That’s not to say that all part-time ghillie’s are bad, but they are more likely to be hit-or-miss. If you want a great ghillie, not just a good ghillie; take your time and do some homework or let us at Lough Fishing Buddies do the home work for you.

    If you would like more information about this article, please feel free to contact me.

    Damien Willis +353(0)868012546

    E-mail info@loughfishingbuddies.com



  • Latest Angling Report Lough Sheelin 24th June 2011

    With the may fly almost at an end – Sheelin did not disapoint this week with a brace of trout all returned safely as pictured below. All our trout rose to a small grey wulf during the late afternoon last week. Sedge fishing is said to be the cream of the season on Sheelin and this commences in full swing from about mid June and continues right through to the end of the season in October 12th. Small brown sedges hatches become prolific as the season advances. Best methods are fishing dry in a small size from 14 to 16’s. Anglers fishing sedges this time of year are advised to look for calm spots on the lake, sit and wait for rises. Anglers will also catch fish: fishing blind, so vary tactics. 

    The Lough also gets hatches of Silverhorn sedges and small dark sedges in August and early September. A small size 12 or 14 fished dry close to the shore especially towards dusk can often take a good trout. Useful fly patterns are Green Peter, Murrough or better known as The Great Red Sedge and smaller brown sedges. Trout will be caught by various methods and using flies not mentioned above. The fly angler should bear in mind two points: Best results are generally obtained along sheltered shores in a small to moderate wave. Fishing the evening rise into the night usually gets better results than day time fishing. Be careful and get to know the lake. Lough fishing buddies actively encourage all anglers to return as many fish as possible in order to safeguard the welfare of the fish for years to come. Lough fishing buddies practise a catch and release policy.

    If you would like more information about this article or wish to arrange a guided days fishing on this lake, please feel free to contact me.

    Damien Willis +353(0) 868012546

    E-mail info@loughfishingbuddies.com